03 QBasic Tutorial Decisions and loops

Learning Objectives

THIS SECTION IS BEING UPDATED… NOV 2015

At the end of this tutorial you will know:

How to use Loops eg conditional (pre-check, post-check), fixed to repeat actions
How to use conditional statements and logical operators to make decisions

Selection: Where you choose to do something or not!

If there is something you might want to do depending on a situation or condition use IF/ENDIF.

If there are one out of two actions you might want to do depending on a situation or condition us IF/ELSE/ENDIF

IF condition1 THEN
 [statementblock-1]
END IF
IF condition1 THEN
 [statementblock-1]
[ELSE]
 [statementblock-2]]
END IF
IF condition1 THEN
 [statementblock-1]
 [ELSEIF condition2 THEN
 [statementblock-2]]...
[ELSE]
 [statementblock-n]]
END IF

condition1 Any expression that can be evaluated as
condition2 true (nonzero) or false (zero).

statementblock – One or more statements on one or more lines of basic.

Conditions

Examples

DIM strName as STRING
CLS
PRINT "Who is a clever clogs? ";
INPUT strName
IF strName <> “Michael” THEN
     PRINT strName “ is a thickie”
ENDIF
PRINT “Michael is clever”
END

Test the program with this data

Input: Michael
Expected output:Michael is clever

Input: Peter Bob Bill Michael MICHAEL, michael, M TOM DAVE
Expected output: is a thickie ( Peter, Bob, Bill, Michael, MICHAEL, etc)  Michael is clever

Using ALL the test data above and change strName <> “Michael” to:

  • strName <= “Michael” strName >= “Michael”
  • strName > “Michael”
  • strName < “Michael”
  • strName = “Michael”
  • strName = “michael”
  • lcase$(strName) = “michael”
  • lcase$(strName) = “Michael”
  • ucase$(strName) = “michael”
  • ucase$(strName) = “MICHAEL”

Make a note of what happened here, you will be asked in class what occurred.

Program Code – Type it in

DIM strName as STRING

CLS

PRINT “Who is a clever clogs? “;

INPUT strName

IF strName <> “Michael” THEN

PRINT strName “ is a thickie”

ELSE

PRINT “Michael is clever”

ENDIF

END

Test the program with this data

Input: Michael

Expected out put:

Michael is clever

Input: Peter Bob Bill Michael MICHAEL, michael, M TOM DAVE

Expected output:

is a thickie ( Peter, Bob, Bill, Michael, MICHAEL, etc)

Michael is clever

Using ALL the test data above and change strName <> “Michael” to:

strName <= “Michael” strName >= “Michael”

strName > “Michael”

strName < “Michael”

strName = “Michael”

strName = “michael”

lcase$(strName) = “michael”

lcase$(strName) = “Michael”

ucase$(strName) = “michael”

ucase$(strName) = “MICHAEL”

Make a note of what happened here, you will be asked in class what occurred.

CASE

Executes one of several statement blocks depending on the value of an

expression.

SELECT CASE testexpression

CASE expressionlist1

[statementblock-1]

[CASE expressionlist2

[statementblock-2]]…

[CASE ELSE

[statementblock-n]]

END SELECT

■ testexpression Any numeric or string expression.

■ expressionlist1 One or more expressions to match testexpression.

■ expressionlist2 The IS keyword must precede any relational operators in an expression.

■ statementblocks One or more basic statements on one or more lines

‘Program: A simple menu

‘Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

DIM strCommand AS STRING

DIM intStartLine AS INTEGER

CLS

LET IntStartLine = 0

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calc Main Menu”

LOCATE intStartLine + 6, 15: Print “[B]lock”

LOCATE intStartLine + 8, 15: Print “[C]ylinder”

LOCATE intStartLine + 10, 15: Print “[P]yramid”

LOCATE intStartLine + 12, 15: Print “Enter B,C,P”

LOCATE intStartLine + 12, 30: INPUT strCommand

‘convert to uppercase

strCommand = UCase$(strCommand)

Select Case strCommand

Case Is = “B”

PRINT “You want a block”

Case Is = “C”

PRINT “You want a Cylinder”

Case Is = “P”

PRINT “You want a Pyramid”

Case Else

PRINT “Don’t know that option”

PRINT “Try again”

End Select

END

Test the program with this data

B “You want a block”, C You want a Cylinder”, P “You want a Pyramid”

Z W “Don’t know that option”

Test Results

STRING FUNCTIONS

LCASE$(stringexpression$)

UCASE$(stringexpression$)

Convert strings to all lowercase or all uppercase letters.

■ stringexpression$ Any string expression.

Example:

strPlace = “THE string”

PRINT strPlace

PRINT LCASE$( strPlace); ” in lowercase”

PRINT UCASE$( strPlace); ” IN UPPERCASE”

LEFT$(stringexpression$,n%)

RIGHT$(stringexpression$,n%)

Return a specified number of leftmost or rightmost characters in a string.

■ stringexpression$ Any string expression.

■ n% The number of characters to return, beginning

with the leftmost or rightmost string character.

Example:

strText = “Microsoft QBasic”

PRINT LEFT$( strText, 5) ‘Output is: Micro

PRINT RIGHT$( strText, 5) ‘Output is: Basic

MID$(stringexpression$,start%[,length%])

MID$(stringvariable$,start%[,length%])=stringexpression$

The MID$ function returns part of a string (a substring).

The MID$ statement replaces part of a string variable with another string.

■ stringexpression$ The string from which the MID$ function returns a substring, or the replacement string used by the MID$ statement. It can be any string expression.

■ start% The position of the first character in the substring being returned or replaced.

■ length% The number of characters in the substring. If the length is omitted, MID$ returns or replaces all characters to the right of the start position.

■ stringvariable$ The string variable being modified by the MID$ statement.

Example:

strPlace = “Where is Paris?”

PRINT MID$( strPlace, 10, 5) ‘Output is: Paris

strPlace = “Paris, France”

PRINT strPlace ‘Output is: Paris, France

MID$( strPlace, 8) = “Texas ”

PRINT strPlace ‘Output is: Paris, Texas

Exercise 1

You know how to input numbers, calculate and print out the answer. Now add the case statement to this knowledge and write a program that will input two numbers and then a menu that will add, multiply, subtract or divide those number and print out the answer. You will need the following basic:

LET + – / *, DIM STRING INTEGER SINGLE, CASE, INPUT, PRINT, PRINT USING , CLS

Checking for errors in input

Avoiding negative numbers in calculations

Type this program in

DIM sngPi, sngRadius, sngArea as SINGLE

CLS

sngPi = 3.1415

INPUT “What is the radius of the circle? (-1 to end) “, sngRadius

IF sngRadius <> -1 THEN

sngArea = sngPi * sngRadius ^ 2

PRINT “The area of the circle is “, sngArea

PRINT

ENDIF

END

Test the program with this data

Input: SngRadius = 2

Output: The area of the circle is

Input: SngRadius = -4 negative radius

Output: The area of the circle is 50.272

Error condition

Input: SngRadius = 20

Output: The area of the circle is

Input: SngRadius = 999999999

Output: The area of the circle is

Error condition

Test the program with this data

Test Results

Try changing sngRadius <> -1 to sngRadius<0

Which is better?

Part 3 Loops/Iteration ‘Repeating things’ (Session 7-9)

There’s one big problem with the program. If you needed to try hundreds of radii, you must run the program over again. This is not practical. If we had some kind of a loop until we wanted to quit that just kept on repeating over and over it would be much more useful. Of course, QBasic has the means of performing this feat. Loop structures. They start with the statement DO, and end with the statement LOOP. You can LOOP UNTIL or WHILE , or DO UNTIL or WHILE a condition is true. Another option (which we will use) is to break out of the loop manually as soon as a condition is true. Lets revise the previous code:

Program Code – Type it in

DIM sngPi, sngRadius, sngArea as SINGLE

CLS

sngPi = 3.1415

DO ‘ Begin the loop here

INPUT “What is the radius of the circle? (-1 to end) “, sngRadius

IF sngRadius <> -1 THEN

sngArea = sngPi * sngRadius ^ 2

PRINT “The area of the circle is “, sngArea

PRINT

ENDIF

LOOP WHILE sngRadius <> -1

END

Test the program with this data

Input: SngRadius = 2

Output: The area of the circle is

Input: SngRadius = -4

Output: Program finishes

Input: SngRadius = 20

Output: The area of the circle is

Input: SngRadius = 999999999

Output: The area of the circle is

Test the program with this data

Test Results

Now we can end the program by entering -1 as the radius. The program checks the radius after the user inputs it and checks if it is -1. If it is, it exits the loop. If it isn’t it just keeps going it’s merry way. TRY changing

LOOP WHILE sngRadius <> -1 to

LOOP UNTIL sngRadius = -1

The Do statement repeats a block of statements depending on a boolean (true or false) condition. The condition is tested at the beginning if it appears on the Do or at the end of the loop if it appears on the Loop. The While keyword continues the loop while the condition is true. The Until keyword continues the loop while the condition is false (stops when the condition is true).

ANSWER THE FOLLOWING 3 QUESTION and you will know what type of loop you will need.

· If you want to repeat something and you know how many times you will do it before you start – used the FOR NEXT LOOP

· If you want to do something at least once and maybe repeat it again – use DO LOOP

· If you are not sure whether you want to do something nor how many times to repeat it – use the DO Loop

FOR loops

Use where you know how many times you want something to repeat.

The FOR statement repeats a block of statements for a specified number of times.

FOR variable=initialValue TO finalValue

Statements are repeated while the variable is at or between initial and final values. The variable is incremented by 1 each time.

NEXT variable

FOR variable=initialValue TO finalValue STEP

Statements are repeated while the variable is at or between initial and final values. The variable is incremented by increment each time.

NEXT variable

Description

Repeats a group of statements a specified number of times.
Syntax

For counter = start To end [Step step]
[statements]
[Exit For]
[statements]
Next

The For…Next statement syntax has these parts:

Part

Description

counter

Numeric variable used as a loop counter. The variable can’t be an array element or an element of a user-defined type.

start

Initial value of counter.

end

Final value of counter.

step

Optional: Amount counter is changed each time through the loop. If not specified, step defaults to one.

statements

One or more statements between For and Next that are executed the specified number of times.

DIM intNumOfTimes,intStart,intEnd AS INTEGER

DIM intIncremnt AS INTEGER

LET intStart = 1

LEt intEnd= 10

LET intIncremnt = 2

FOR intNumOfTimes = intStart TO intEnd STEP intIncremnt

Print intNumOfTimes

NEXT ntNumOfTimes

The step argument can be either positive or negative. The value of the step argument determines loop processing as follows:

Value

Loop executes if

Positive or 0

counter <= end Negative counter >= end

Once the loop starts and all statements in the loop have executed, step is added to counter. At this point, either the statements in the loop execute again (based on the same test that caused the loop to execute initially), or the loop is exited and execution continues with the statement following the Next statement.

Tip Changing the value of counter while inside a loop can make it more difficult to read and debug your code.

EXIT FOR

Exit For can only be used within a For Each…Next or For…Next control structure to provide an alternate way to exit. Any number of Exit For statements may be placed anywhere in the loop. Exit For is often used with the evaluation of some condition (for example, If…Then), and transfers control to the statement immediately following Next.

You can nest For…Next loops by placing one For…Next loop within another. Give each loop a unique variable name as its counter. The following construction is correct:

For I = 1 To 10

For J = 1 To 10

For K = 1 To 10

. . .

Next

Next

Next

DO LOOPS

Use this loop when your are not sure how many times you want repeat something, but you do know you want to do the action(s) at least once

Use a Do loop to execute a block of statements an indefinite number of times. There are several variations of the Do…Loop statement, but each evaluates a numeric condition to determine whether to continue execution. As with If…Then, the condition must be a value or expression that evaluates to False (zero) or to True (nonzero).

DO LOOP (Pre-test)

DO WHILE condition

The condition is tested at the beginning of every loop.

Statements are repeated while the condition is true

 

LOOP

DO UNTIL condition

The condition is tested at the beginning of every loop.

statements repeated while the condition is false

 

LOOP

Dim IntCount AS INTEGER
intCount = 1
DO WHILE intCount < 10

PRINT intCount
intCount = intCount + 1
Loop

END

Try the operators <=, < , > = and <> too

Dim IntCount AS INTEGER
intCount = 1
DO UNTIL intCount >= 10

PRINT intCount
intCount = intCount + 1
LOOP

END

Try the operators <=, < , > = and <> too

DO LOOP (post-test)

This variation of the Do…Loop statement executes the statements first and then tests condition after each execution. This variation guarantees at least one execution of statements:

DO

statements repeated while the condition is true

The condition is tested at the end of every loop.

LOOP WHILE condition

DO

statements repeated while the condition is false

The condition is tested at the end of every loop.

LOOP UNTIL condition

The loop can execute any number of times, as long as condition is nonzero or True.

Dim IntCount AS INTEGER
intCount = 1
DO

PRINT intCount
intCount = intCount + 1
LOOP WHILE intCount < 10

END

Try the operators <=, < , > = and <> too

This is another variation analogous to the previous one, except that they loop as long as condition is False rather than True.

Dim IntCount AS INTEGER
intCount = 1
DO

PRINT intCount
intCount = intCount + 1
LOOP UNTIL intCount >= 10

END

‘ Try the operators <=, < , > = and <> too

Exercises 2

Modify each of the above DO LOOPS so that the Statement block within the loop does the following:

A) Problem one

Input a number
adds it to a total
when the loop finishes it prints out the total of all numbers input.

(HINT Total= Total + NumberToBeAdded)

B) Problem 2

Input a number
Multiplies the number by itself (squared)
Adds the square to a total
When the loop finishes it prints out the total of all numbers input squared.

(HINT Total= Total + NumberToBeAdded)

C) Problem 3

Modify the CASE statement menu program so that it is in a loop. Add an option so that the program quits the loop and finishes when “Q” is entered.

Example of a CGI program

This programs output is HTML, suitable for a web browser

Dim strAirport As String
Dim strTime As String
Dim strDestination As String
Cls
Do While 1 <> 2
RESTORE Start
INPUT strDestination
Print “” Print “” Print “Current flights” Print “” Print “”
READ strAirport, strTime
Do Until UCase$(strAirport) = “END”
READ strAirport, strTime
If UCase$(strAirport) = UCase$(strDestination) Then
Print ”

Airport: “; strAirport; Tab(25); ” Time:

“; Tab(45); strTime
End If
Loop
Print ”

” Print “”
Loop
End
Start: Data “Rome”, “6:00”
Data “Rome”, “7:00”
Data “Rome”, “9:00”
Data “Rome”, “11:00”
Data “Rome”, “14:00”
Data “Rome”, “19:00”
Data “Rome”, “6:00”
Data “Paris”, “7:30”
Data “Paris”, “9:30”
Data “Paris”, “11:30”
Data “Paris”, “14:20”
Data “Paris”, “19:20”
Data “END”, “”

 

Download it here and type in Paris, then London and finally Rome

Testing

Black box and white-box are test design methods. Black-box test design treats the system as a “black-box”, so it does not explicitly use knowledge of the internal structure. Black-box test design is usually described as focusing on testing functional requirements.

Synonyms for Black-box include: behavioural, functional, opaque-box, and Closed-box. White-box test design allows one to peek inside the “box”, and it focuses specifically on using internal knowledge of the software to guide the selection of test data.

Synonyms for white-box include: structural, glass-box and clear-box.

While black box and white-box are terms that are still in popular use, many people prefer the terms “behavioural” and “structural”. Behavioural Test design is slightly different from black-box test design because the use of internal knowledge isn’t strictly forbidden, but it’s still discouraged. In practice, it hasn’t proven useful to use a single test design method. One has to use a mixture of different methods so that they aren’t hindered by the limitations of a particular one. Some call this “grey-box” or “translucent-box” test design.

It is important to understand that these methods are used during the test design phase, and their influence is hard to see in the tests once they’re implemented. Note that any level of testing (unit testing, system testing, etc.) can use any test design methods. Unit testing is usually associated with structural test design, but this is because testers usually don’t have well-defined requirements at the unit level to validate.

Black box testing

A software testing technique whereby the internal workings of the item being tested are not known by the tester. For example, in a black box test on a software design the tester only knows the inputs and what the expected outcomes should be and not how the program arrives at those outputs. The tester does not ever examine the programming code and does not need any further knowledge of the program other than its specifications.

The advantages of this type of testing include:

The test is unbiased because the designer and the tester are independent of each other.
The tester does not need knowledge of any specific programming languages.
The test is done from the point of view of the user, not the designer.
Test cases can be designed as soon as the specifications are complete.

The disadvantages of this type of testing include:

The test can be redundant if the software designer has already run a test case.

The test cases are difficult to design.

Testing every possible input stream is unrealistic because it would take a inordinate amount of time; therefore, many program paths will go untested.
White box testing

Also known as glass box, structural, clear box and open box testing. A software testing technique whereby explicit knowledge of the internal workings of the item being tested are used to select the test data. Unlike black box testing, white box testing uses specific knowledge of programming code to examine outputs. The test is accurate only if the tester knows what the program is supposed to do. He or she can then see if the program diverges from its intended goal. White box testing does not account for errors caused by omission, and all visible code must also be readable.

For a complete software examination, both white box and black box tests are required.

Source Webopedia

Test data

Test data should include:

1) Normal data, but avoid the same number for two different input values.

2) Extreme data

a. Extra high values

b. Low values

c. Negative

d. zero

3) Abnormal

a. Numbers where text strings expected

b. Text where numbers expected

c. No entry of data where data expected.

Some examples of Loops and selections

A history database, try these programs out with the following data:

First just press return then try: hitler, nero, bodica, capt kirk, moses, noah, dracula, dumbo

Look at the each of the programs and find out what each part does.

History 1 Uses IF

History 2 Uses CASE. This has some errors for you to correct first

Histroy 3 Final Version

Exercises 3 (Session 11-12) (suitable variable names, indention and comments)

Write and test the following programs using:

“PRINT USING” to format any answer.
LOCATE to position inputs and outputs.

a) Test data and expected results for a range of test values

b) Program listing include suitable variable names, indention and comments

c) Screen shots of the test results

a) Input and adds 3 Integer numbers together

b) Input and adds 3 floating point numbers together then divides by 3

c) Input and adds 3 floating numbers together then divides by 3 and then multiplies the answer by 10.

d) Calculate the circumference of a given circle.

e) Input hours worked (floating point) and manufacturing cost per hours (floating point) to calculate the total manufacturing cost of a product

f) Input 5 numbers and display the average.

g) Input hours worked and manufacturing cost per hours to calculate the total manufacturing cost for 5 products.

h) Input length and width then calculate the area of any rectangle in metre2.

i) Input length and width then calculate the area of any two rectangle in metre2.

j) A pool consists of two rectangles in metre2. One of the rectangles is the water-covered area. The other is the full size of pool area (Including water and paved edge. Subtract the total area for the water from the full pool size to produce the paved area. Print water and paved areas out.

· Paved area = Total area – water area

Using DO LOOPS

k) A program that prints out the 3 times table using a DO LOOP

l) A program that prints out the 3 times table using a FOR NEXT LOOP

m) Enter the names mary, bill, bob, jane, gill randomly. The program should say if the name is male or female

n) A program that add a series of number and stops when a negative number is entered. The program then displays the sum of the numbers. (Needs IF and DO LOOP)

o) A program that prints out the Times Table (up to 12 numbers in a column) for any number

Now do assignment 1 Week 12

05 SIPOS Design

SIPOS is a simple design process that allows you design a simple program and produce the code automatically, while also producing the final paper-based documentation.  This methodology works well for BTEC Software development courses. If you do not skip a step and throughly test each stage, you will produce a working solution much faster than just ‘messing about and dabbling.’ with making the code first that newbies normally want to do….

(Input/Output Data and calculations/processes)

Learning Objectives

At the end of this tutorial you will know about:

  • Understand how to design software and use a design tool
  • Be able to design and create a program
  • Technical documentation: requirements specification; other as appropriate  structure charts, data dictionary

1) Work out the problem’s calculation backwards

2) Put calculations into the Process Column. Make sure you arrange them this way:

Answer = Calculation

3) Check you have used brackets (BODMAS) if required, because multiply and divide is always done before add and subtract . e.g. A = 4 + 6 / 2 A = 7. A= ( 4 + 6)/2 A= 5

4) Work through the right hand side of the calculations and decide whether the variables are input, stored or a calculated output from a previous calculation.

5) Work through the input, output and stored variables and decide if they are:

INTEGER (int)- The largest integer value is 215= ±32768
LONG (lng) – The largest integer value is 231= ±2147483648
SINGLE (sng) – Single-precision floating-point variables can represent a number up to seven digits in length. The decimal point can be anywhere within those digits.
DOUBLE (dbl) – Double-precision floating-point variables can represent a number up to 15 digits in length. The decimal point can be anywhere within those digits.

Problem work out the cost of painting a ceiling

A) Work backwards from the final answer

PaintCost = Price per litre X Litres needed

Price is given, but litres needed require calculation.

Litres Needed = Tins Needed X SizeOfTin

Size of tin is given, but tins needed require calculation.

TinsNeeded = CeilingArea / CoverageOfTin

Coverage of a tin is given, but area needed require calculation.

CeilingArea = Width Of Room X Length Of Room

Both width and length will be input for each room

Place the calculation in reverse order into the SIPO table

Stored

Input


Processes

Outputs

 


CeilingArea = WidthOfRoom * LengthOfRoom


TinsNeeded = CeilingArea / CoverageOfTin


LitresNeeded = TinsNeeded X  SizeOfTin


PaintCost = TinPricePerLitre * LitresNeeded

 

B) Work out for each calculation, what is output and what needs to be input or previously stored.

Work right to left

CeilingArea = WidthOfRoom * LengthOfRoom
WidthOfRoom is INPUT
LengthOfRoom is INPUT
CeilingArea is Output
TinsNeeded = CeilingArea / CoverageOfTin
CeilingArea is already available as output
CoverageOfTin is to be stored in the program
TinsNeeded is output
LitresNeeded = TinsNeeded X SizeOfTin
TinsNeeded is already available as output
SizeOfTin is to be stored in program
LitresNeeded is output
PaintCost = TinPricePerLitre * LitresNeeded
TinPricePerLitre is to be stored in the program
LitresNeeded is already available as output
PaintCost is output

Stored

Input

Processes

Outputs

CoverageOfTin

TinPricePerLitre

SizeOfTin

 

WidthOfRoom

LengthOfRoom

 

CeilingArea =
WidthOfRoom * LengthOfRoom

TinsNeeded =
CeilingArea / CoverageOfTin

LitresNeeded =
TinsNeeded X  SizeOfTin

PaintCost =
TinPricePerLitre* LitresNeeded

 

CeilingArea

TinsNeeded

LitresNeeded

PaintCost

C) Design Stage Work out varable type

Stored

Input

Processes

Outputs

CoverageOfTin

TinPricePerLitre

SizeOfTin

 

WidthOfRoom

LengthOfRoom

 

CeilingArea =
WidthOfRoom * LengthOfRoom

TinsNeeded =
CeilingArea / CoverageOfTin

LitresNeeded =
TinsNeeded X  SizeOfTin

PaintCost =
TinPricePerLitre* LitresNeeded

 

CeilingArea

TinsNeeded

LitresNeeded

PaintCost

D) Use the table to produce the Structure chart

image002

E) Produce a data dictionary

The can also be used to help design the Input and output screens. Note there are no whole numers and none of them exceed 7 digits. Single precision are therefore acceptable as variables

Item Variable Name

Type

Format
Picture/Length

sngCoverageOfTin

sngPricePerLitre

sngSizeOfTin

sngWidthOfRoom


sngLengthOfRoom

dblCeilingArea

sngTinsNeeded

sngLitresNeeded

sngPaintCost

sngCoverageOfTin

sngPricePerLitre

sngSizeOfTin

sngWidthOfRoom


sngLengthOfRoom

dblCeilingArea

sngTinsNeeded

sngLitresNeeded

sngPaintCost

 single

single

single

single

single

single

single

single

single

 99.99

99.99

99.9

99.99

99.99

99999.99

99.99

9999.99

9999.99

F) Create the Screen Design

part_53

G: Creating the program

You can use the SIPO table to produce the program

The input, output and stored variables can be used pasted at the beginning and turned into DIM statements

DIM sngCoverageOfTin AS SINGLE
DIM dblTinPricePerLitre AS SINGLE
DIM sngSizeOfTin AS SINGLE
REM Input variables
DIM sngWidthOfRoom AS SINGLE
DIM sngLengthOfRoom AS SINGLE
REM Calculatated variables
DIM dblCeilingArea AS SINGLE
DIM sngTinsNeeded AS SINGLE
DIM sngLitresNeeded AS SINGLE
DIM sngPaintCost AS SINGLE

The add the stored values and turn them into LETS

REM Stored values
LET sngCoverageOfTin= 40
LET sngTinPricePerLitre = 5.2
LET sngSizeOfTin = 2.5

Add the INPUTS

INPUT sngWidthOfRoom
INPUT sngLengthOfRoom

Add the calculations

LET dblCeilingArea = sngWidthOfRoom * sngLengthOfRoom
LET sngTinsNeeded = dblCeilingArea / sngCoverageOfTin
LET sngLitresNeeded = sngTinsNeeded * sngSizeOfTin
LET sngPaintCost = sngPricePerLitre * sngLitresNeeded

then print the answers out using the outputsdblCeilingArea

REM Display the answers
PRINT sngTinsNeeded
PRINTsngLitresNeeded
PRINT sngPaintCost
END

Note a better way to store values that don’t change in program is to use CONST to declares symbolic constants. The following comes from the QBASIC help file.

CONST constantname = expression [

constantname: The name of the constant. This name can consist of up to 40 characters and must begin with a letter. Valid characters are A-Z, 0-9, and period (.). expression

An expression that is assigned to the constant. The expression can consist of literals (such as 1.0), other constants, any arithmetic or logical operators except exponentiation (^), or a single literal string. Place the CONST after your DIMs. It is good practice to put the DIMs/CONSTs in alphabetical order.

Example:

CONST PI = 3.141593
CONST intCoverageOfTin= 40
CONST dblTinPricePerLitre = 5.2
CONST sngSizeOfTin = 2.5

04 QBasic Tutorial Procedures

SECTION 5 – DESIGNING APPLICATIONS (Linear V Modular)

Learning Objectives

At the end of this tutorial  you will know about:

  • How to use functions and procedures

It is not practical in real world terms to set up an application in one long list of code. Many early programming languages were purely linear, meaning that they started from one point on a list of code, and ended at another point. However, linear programming is not practical in a team environment. If one person could write one aspect of code, and another write another part of the program, things would be much more organized. QBasic contains the capability to meet these needs, called modular programming. You can break a program into different “modules” which are separate from the main program and yet can be accessed by any part of it. I highly recommend the use of separate modules in programming applications, although it is not a simple task to learn.

 Procedures & Functions

These separate modules are also known as procedures in the QBasic environment. There are two types of procedures: subs and functions. Subs merely execute a task and return to the main program, which functions execute a task and return a value to the main program. An example of a sub might be a procedure which displays a title screen on the screen, while a function may be a procedure that returns a degree in degrees given a number in radians. Function procedures are also used in Calculus, so you Calculus people should already be familiar with functions.

Arguments

Procedures can accept arguments in what is called an argument list. Each argument in the argument list has a defined type, and an object of that type must be passed to the procedure when it is called. For example, the CHR$ QBasic function accepts a numeric argument. The function itself converts this numeric argument into a string representation of the ASCII value of the number passed, and returns this one character string.

Procedures

Procedures in QBasic are given their own screen. When you enter the QBasic IDE, you are in the main procedure which can access all the others. Other procedures are created by typing the type of procedure (SUB or FUNCTION), the procedure name, followed by the complete argument list. You can view your procedures through the VIEW menu. Here is an example of a sub procedure which performs some operations for a program that will be using graphics, random numbers, and a logical plane.

 

SUB initProgram()

RANDOMIZE TIMER

SCREEN 12

WINDOW (0,0)-(100,100)

COLOR 15

END SUB

 

The only thing you need to type is SUB initProgram (), and the screen will be switched to that procedure. The END SUB is placed there for you, so the only thing you need to type then is the code within the sub. Try typing this out on your own to see how this works. This procedure is called by simply typing initProgram in the main procedure. An alternative method is CALL initProcedure (). Right here the parentheses are optional, but if you were to pass arguments to the procedure, parentheses would be required with the CALL statement. Now lets try passing an argument to a procedure. We will pass two arguments to a procedure called centre which are a string containing the text to be centreed, and the horizontal location on the screen at which you wish to centre it.

 

SUB centre( strText, sngHLointC )

LOCATE sngHLointC, 41 – (LEN(strText) / 2)

PRINT strText

END SUB

 

The first line after the sub declaration positions the starting point of the text at the horizontal location we passed at the second argument and vertical coordinate. The vertical coordinate is calculated by subtracting one half the screen’s width in characters (41) and half the LENgth of the text we passed as the first argument. We would call centre from the main procedure like this:

centre “Programmed by QP7”, 12

Or like this

CALL centre (“Programmed by QP7”, 12)

The Concrete Calculator

This program calculates the volume of a block using a procedure

 Program Code – Type it in
DECLARE SUB subBlock ()

DECLARE SUB subcylinder ()

‘Program: Concrete Calculator

‘Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

‘This program will work out costings for quotes

Dim dblTotalVolume As Double

Dim intStartLine As Integer

‘Main section

intStartLine = 2

Call subBlock

End

 

Sub subBlock()

‘Procedure to calculate volume of a block

Dim sngHeight, sngWidth, sngLength As Single

Dim dblVolume As Double

Color 10, 1

Cls

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Height”

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Width”

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 5: Print “Length”

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Volume”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, sngHeight

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, sngWidth

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 12: INPUT ” “, sngLength

‘Calculate Volume

dblVolume = sngHeight * sngWidth * sngLength

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; dblVolume;

End Sub

Test the program with this data
Input:

Expected output:

 

 

Results

The full program in modular form can be found here. A menu using procedures is used and INKEY$ which reads a character from the keyboard.

IN KEY$

■ INKEY$ returns a null string if there is no character to return
■ For standard keys, INKEY$ returns a 1-byte string containing the character read.
■ For extended keys, INKEY$ returns a 2-byte string made up of the   character (ASCII 0) and the keyboard scan code.

Example:
PRINT “Press Esc to exit…”
DO

LOOP UNTIL INKEY$ = CHR$(27)   ’27 is the ASCII code for Esc.

Keycodes

Key        Code   ║     Key         Code   ║     Key        Code
 c        1       ║     A           30     ║    Caps Lock   58
 ! or 1   2       ║     S           31     ║     F1           59
 @ or 2   3       ║     D           32     ║     F2           60
 # or 3   4       ║     F           33     ║     F3           61
 $ or 4   5       ║     G           34     ║     F4           62
 % or 5   6       ║     H           35     ║     F5           63
 ^ or 6   7       ║     J           36     ║     F6           64
 & or 7   8       ║     K           37     ║     F7           65
 * or 8   9       ║     L           38     ║     F8           66
 ( or 9   10      ║     : or ;      39     ║     F9           67
 ) or 0   11      ║     " or '      40     ║     F10               
          12      ║     ~ or `      41     ║     F11         133
 + or =   13      ║     Left Shift  42     ║     F12         134 
 Bksp     14      ║     | or \      43     ║     NumLock      69
 Tab      15      ║     Z           44     ║     Scroll Lock  70
 Q        16      ║     X           45     ║     Home or 7   71

 

This is the full program

DECLARE SUB subBlock ()
DECLARE SUB subCylinder ()
‘Program: Concrete Calculator
‘Author Michael Fabbro
‘Date 7 December 2003
‘This program will work out costings for quotes

‘Glossary of Variables
‘intStartLine – start position of the inputscrenn
‘dblTotalVolume – running total of volume

‘Global Scope Variables
Dim dblTotalVolume As Double
Dim intStartLine As Integer
‘Local Variables
Dim strCommand As String

‘Main section
‘initialise variables
dblTotalVolume = 0

‘Set up input screen
intStartLine = 2
Color 10, 1
DO
CLS
LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calc Main Menu”
LOCATE intStartLine + 6, 15: Print “[B]lock”
LOCATE intStartLine + 8, 15: Print “[C]ylinder”
LOCATE intStartLine + 10, 15: Print “[R]set Total”
LOCATE intStartLine + 12, 15: Print “[Q]uit”
LOCATE intStartLine + 14, 15: Print “Enter B,C,R,Q”
strCommand = “”
‘scan for menu choice
Do While strCommand = “”
‘note strCommand= ucase$(inkey$) is a better solution
strCommand = INKEY$
Loop
‘note strCommand= ucase$(inkey$) above is a better solution
‘convert to uppercase
strCommand = UCase$(strCommand)
Select Case strCommand
Case Is = “B”
Call subBlock
Case Is = “C”
Call subCylinder
Case Is = “R”
dblTotalVolume = 0
Case Is = “Q”
END
END SELECT
LOOP WHILE strCommand <> “Q”

Sub subBlock()
‘Procedure to calculate volume of a block

‘ Alphabetical Glossary of Local Variables
‘ sngJunk – used for pausing screen
‘sngLength – Length of Cylinder
‘sngWidth – Width of Block
‘sngHeight – height of block
‘dblVolume – Calulated Volume of Cylinder

‘Declare Local Variables
Dim sngRadius, sngWidth, sngLength As Single
Dim dblVolume As Double
Dim strJunk As String

‘input screen
Color 10, 1
Cls
LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”
LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Height”
LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Width”
LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 5: Print “Length”
LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Volume”
LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, sngHeight
LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, sngWidth
LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 12: INPUT ” “, sngLength
‘Calculate Volume and output
dblVolume = sngHeight * sngWidth * sngLength
dblTotalVolume = dblTotalVolume + dblVolume
LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; dblVolume;
Print ” Cubic Metres”
LOCATE intStartLine + 17, 24: Print “Total so far: “;
Print USING “#####.##”; dblTotalVolume;
Print ” Cubic Metres”
LOCATE intStartLine + 19, 24: INPUT “Press enter to continue”; strJunk
End Sub

Sub subCylinder()
‘Subroutine to calulate volume of a concrete cylinder

‘Alphabetical Glossary of Local Variables
‘sngJunk – used for pausing screen
‘sngLength – Length of Cylinder
‘sngRadius – Radius of Cylinder
‘dblVolume – Calulated Volume of Cylinder

‘Declare Local Variables
Dim strJunk As String
Dim sngLength, sngRadius As Integer
Dim dblVolume As Integer
Const conPi = 3.142

‘Procedure to calculate volume of a cylinder
Color 10, 1
CLS
LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”
LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Radius”
LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Length”
LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Volume”
LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, sngRadius
LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, sngLength
‘Calculate Volume
dblVolume = conPi * sngRadius ^ 2 * sngLength
dblTotalVolume = dblTotalVolume + dblVolume
LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; dblVolume;
Print ” Cubic Metres”
LOCATE intStartLine + 17, 24: Print “Total so far: “;
Print USING “#####.##”; dblTotalVolume;
Print ” Cubic Metres”
LOCATE intStartLine + 19, 24: INPUT “Press enter to continue”; strJunk
End Sub

Download the program here

 

Advanced Example

There is one final concept which has proven to be very successful in programming: a message loop. With QBasic, you can construct a loop which runs for the length of the program, receives input from the user, and executes a message based on what the user does. We will construct a basic application which receives input from the user in the form of an arrow key, and moves a box on the screen based on the direction the user pressed. The arrow keys are different from normal inputted keys received with INKEY$.

 

On the enhanced 101 keyboards which have arrow keys, INKEY$ returns two values: the ASCII text representation of the key pressed, and the keyboard scan code of the key pressed. Since the arrow keys do not have an ASCII text representation, we must use the keyboard scan codes for them. The keyboard scan codes can be viewed in the HELP | CONTENTS section of the QBasic menus. For this program, we will have two procedures in addition to the main procedure. The first will initialize the program settings and position the character in his starting position. The other will move the guy in the direction which we pass to the function. The main procedure will call the sub procedures and contains the main message loop which retrieves input from the user. First of all, here is the code for the main procedure:

 

CONST UP = 1
CONST DOWN = 2
CONST LEFT = 3
CONST RIGHT = 4

 

TYPE objectType

intX AS INTEGER
intY AS INTEGER

END TYPE

DIM object AS objectType

initScreen
object.x = 41
object.y = 24

 

 

DO

SELECT CASE INKEY$

CASE CHR$(0) + CHR$(72)

move UP, object

CASE CHR$(0) + CHR$(80)

move DOWN, object

CASE CHR$(0) + CHR$(75)

move LEFT, object

CASE CHR$(0) + CHR$(77)

move RIGHT, object

CASE CHR$(32)

EXIT DO

END SELECT

LOOP

LOCATE 1,1: PRINT “Thank you for playing”

END

 

This code is fairly self explanatory with the exception of the SELECT CASE… END SELECT structure which I have not yet explained. This type of conditional testing format tests a condition, and several cases for that condition are then tested. In this case, we are seeing IF INKEY$ = CHR$(0) + CHR$(72), IF INKEY$ = CHR$(0) + CHR$(80), and so on. This is just a more legible format than IF…THEN…ELSE. Note that in the QuickBasic compiler, a CASE ELSE statement is required in the structure for what reason

 

I have no idea. The above code is the driver for the rest of the program. First some CONSTants are declared which remain constant for the duration of the program and in any module. A user defined type is declared to store the coordinates of the character.

 

Then an endless loop is executed, calling the appropriate procedure for the arrow key pressed until the user presses the space bar (CHR$(32)). Here is the code for the initScreen procedure:

 

SUB initScreen ()

SCREEN 12

COLOR 9

WIDTH 80,50

LOCATE 24,41

PRINT CHR$(1)

END SUB

 

The WIDTH 80,50 statement sets the screen text resolution to 80 columns and 50 rows. We then print a smiley face in the middle of the screen in a nice bright blue colour. Next we need to write the move procedure, and then we will be done with the program.

 

SUB move (way AS INTEGER, object AS objectType)

LOCATE object.y, object.x

PRINT CHR$(0)       ‘ erase previous image

SELECT CASE way

CASE UP

IF object.y > 1 THEN

object.y = object.y – 1

END IF

CASE DOWN

IF object.y < 49 THEN

object.y = object.y + 1

END IF

CASE LEFT

IF object.x > 1 THEN

object.x = object.x – 1

END IF

CASE RIGHT

IF object.x < 79 THEN

object.x = object.x + 1

END IF

END SELECT

LOCATE object.y, object.x

PRINT CHR$(1)       ‘ draw current image

END SUB

 

And that’s the whole program… confusing as it may be! Ideas should be going through your head about what you could do with this information. Entire games can be created with this simple construct.

 

There are more things to consider, but they are beyond the scope of this tutorial. If you were to design an application in QBasic, you would only need the information from this section and  imagination. Programming takes knowledge of the language and a creative mind… programs are made by programmers with both. If you can develop a creative mind, then you can develop any program conceivable.

Validation Checking for Errors

This program checks the input of hours worked for erroneous data, i.e. working for more than 60 hours.

‘ Program to validate inputs
‘ Author Michael J Fabbro
‘ Date 16 December 2003
Dim sngHoursWorked As Integer
Const cntRed = 12
Const cntBlue = 9
Const cntYellow = 14
Color cntYellow, cntBlue
Cls
Do
LOCATE 5, 5: Print “Hours Worked: “;
INPUT ” “, sngHoursWorked
If sngHoursWorked >= 60 Then
‘ invalid hours input
Color , cntRed
LOCATE 7, 5: Print “Warning ‘con’ in progress”
Do
Loop While INKEY$ = “”
Color cntYellow, cntBlue
Cls
End If
Loop While sngHoursWorked >= 60

 

This is a final example of Validation

‘ Program to validate inputs
‘ Author Michael J Fabbro
‘ Date 16 December 2003
Dim strTitle As String
‘ Modification of valid titles?
Const strValidTitles = “Mr:Mrs:Ms:Master”
Const cntRed = 12
Const cntBlue = 9
Const cntYellow = 14
Color cntYellow, cntBlue
CLS
DO
LOCATE 5, 5: Print “Title: “;
INPUT ” “, strTitle
Select Case strTitle
Case Is = “Mr”
LOCATE 7, 5: Print “Male title known”
Case Is = “Mrs”
LOCATE 7, 5: Print “Female title known”
Case Is = “Ms”
LOCATE 7, 5: Print “Female title known”
Case Else
‘ invalid title
Color , cntRed
LOCATE 7, 5: Print “Title not known”
Do
Loop While INKEY$ = “”
Color cntYellow, cntBlue
Cls
End Select
Loop Until strTitle = “Mr” Or strTitle = “Ms” Or strTitle = “Mrs”

 

02 Tutorial – Software Development Basic QBasic

INTRODUCTION Session 1

Learning Objectives

At the end of this tutorial  you will know about:

  • The basic nature and features of a procedural programming language
  • Variables –  naming conventions and data types: text; integer; floating point; byte; date; Boolean. The benefits of appropriate choice of data type eg additional validation and efficiency of storage
  • How and when to use assignment statements; input statements; output statements

SECTION 1 – VARIABLES

A variable, simply defined, is a name which can contain a value. Programming involves giving values to these names and presenting them in some form to the user. A variable has a type which is defined by the kind of value it holds. If the variable holds a number, it may be of integer, floating decimal, long integer, or imaginary. If the variable holds symbols or text, it may be a character variable or a string variable. These are terms you will become accustomed to as you continue programming.

Here are some examples of values a variable might contain:

  • STRING       “hello, this is a string”
  • INTEGER     5
  • LONG         92883
  • SINGLE       39.2932
  • DOUBLE       98334288.18
  • INTEGER A 16-bit signed integer variable.
  • LONG       32-bit signed integer variable.
  • SINGLE   single-precision 32-bit floating-point variable.
  • DOUBLE double-precision 64-bit floating-point variable.
  • STRING * n% fixed-length string variable n% bytes long.
  • STRING   variable-length string variable.
  • INTEGER (int)- The largest integer value is 215= ± 32768. The smallest is 1, if you exclude zero.
  • LONG (lnt) – The largest integer value is 231= ±2147483648. The smallest is 1, if you exclude zero.
  • SINGLE (sng) – Single-precision floating-point variables can represent a number up to seven digits in length. The decimal point can be anywhere within those digits. The largest number is 9,999,999 the smallest is .0000001 if you exclude zero.
  • DOUBLE (dbl) – Double-precision floating-point variables can represent a number up to 15 digits in length. The decimal point can be anywhere within those digits. The largest number is 99,999,999,999,999,999 the smallest is .000000000000001 if you exclude zero.

 

Variable types support by C++

 

Name Description Size* Range*
char Character or small integer. 1byte signed: -128 to 127
unsigned: 0 to 255
short int (short) Short Integer. 2bytes signed: -32768 to 32767
unsigned: 0 to 65535
int Integer. 4bytes signed: -2147483648 to 2147483647
unsigned: 0 to 4294967295
long int (long) Long integer. 4bytes signed: -2147483648 to 2147483647
unsigned: 0 to 4294967295
bool Boolean value. It can take one of two values: true or false. 1byte true or false
float Floating point number. 4bytes +/- 3.4e +/- 38 (~7 digits)
double Double precision floating point number. 8bytes +/- 1.7e +/- 308 (~15 digits)
long double Long double precision floating point number. 8bytes +/- 1.7e +/- 308 (~15 digits)
wchar_t Wide character. 2 or 4 bytes 1 wide character

Declaration of variables

In order to use a variable in BASIC we must first declare it specifying which data type we want it to be. The syntax to declare a new variable is to write the specifier of the desired data type (like int, bool, float…) followed by a valid variable identifier. For example:
DIM intNumber AS INTEGER

Remember  the largest integer value you can store in here is is 215= ± 32768. The smallest is 1, if you exclude zero. It will use up two bytes of RAM in the memory used by the program.  It uses two bytes to store number

DIM lngNumber AS LONG

The largest integer value is now 231= ±2147483648. The smallest is 1, if you exclude zero. LONG uses four bytes to store a number.

Note

You choose which on the basis of speed and ram usage.

Think

This is done by using the DIM statement. Say you wanted to make a variable called intNumber which would contain an integer (whole number, no digits after the decimal point).

Then you would use that variable as an integer. The word DIM actually originates from the word Dimension, but you won’t see why until we discuss the topic of arrays.

SECTION 2 – INTERACTING WITH THE COMPUTER

You know what a variable is and how to control them, it’s time you learned some programming. QBasic (like all other languages) is set up using pre-defined statements according to the syntax specified for that statement. It may be helpful to look in the help index to learn a statement, although I’ve heard many complaint’s that the help index is too hard. Indeed it is too hard for new programmers, but as you learn more and more statements and their syntaxes, you’ll become accustomed to the index and use it as a casual reference. Lets make a program that prints some text on the screen. Type qbasic at the DOS prompt and enter the following program.

Program Code – Type it in
CLSPRINT “This text will appear on the screen”

END

Test the program with this data
Input: NoneExpected out put:

This text will appear on the screen

Test results (Write results in the ox below)

 

Typing

QBasic allows to you define the ‘type’  of variable as number or characters like C++. It also allows loose typing, i.e where context tells you the type of data stored. Below is show how variables can be ‘typed,’ for loose typing all you need to do is give a variable a value:

name$ =” fred

age=3

pay = 3.45

This means spelling errors in variable names can cause problems. JavaScript is prone to this. QBasic provides good practice in dealing with this problem.

 

 

COLOUR

Below are the 16 colours QBASIC uses –

 

00 = black01 = dark blue

02 = dark green

03 = dark cyan

04 = dark red

05 = dark purple

06 = orange brown

07 = gray

08 = dark gray09 = light blue

10 = light green

11 = light cyan

12 = light red

13 = magenta

14 = yellow

15 = bright white

 

 softwareexampledoit   CLS

COLOR 12

PRINT “I’m light red text!”

COLOR 14

PRINT “I’m yellow text!”

END

Sets the screen display colours.

COLOR [foreground%] [,[background%] [,border%]]   Screen mode 0 (text only)

COLOR [background%] [,palette%]                   Screen mode 1

COLOR [foreground%]                               Screen modes 4, 12, 13

COLOR [foreground%] [,background&]                 Screen modes 7-10

foreground%   A number that sets the foreground screen colour.

background%   A number that sets the background screen colour.

border%       A colour attribute that sets the screen border colour.

palette%       A number (0 or 1) that specifies which of two sets of colour attributes to use:

The available colour attributes and values depend on your graphics adapter and the screen mode set by the most recent SCREEN statement

LET and INPUT

You have learned how to   use the PRINT and CLS commands. In this chapter, you will learn about   variables and the INPUT command.

What are variables? Variables are “boxes” in the computer’s memory to store a value – be it a number, name, decimal, currency amount, or what have you. There are two main types of variables – numbers and “strings,”   which are text variables.

The “numbers” category is further broken down into two areas.

Integer Numbers

Integers, they can be in the range of -32767 to 32767.

Long integers, they have a range of -2 billion to 2 billion. “Why not make all numbers long integers?” The memory of the computer, especially in QBasic, is limited – you should save as much space as possible. Only use long integers where they are necessary.

 

Floating-point” numbers.

These are decimal variables that can have very long decimal spaces.

Single types

Double types

You still may be in the dark as to how variables are used.

Variables are assigned a value using the LET command. For example:

LET intNumber = 123

This would assign a value of 123 to the short integer variable   ” intNumber.” You can use maths functions while assigning variables, too.   “LET intNumber = 4 * 12″ would make ” intNumber ” equal 48. You can increment variables like this:

LET intNumber = intNumber + 1

Or, you can make it ” intNumber = intNumber + 2, intNumber = number – 1,” and   so on. You can also add two variables together using the same syntax, or sequence of commands. You need a way to output these variables to the screen if you   want them to have any meaning to the user of the program.

You can use the PRINT command for this task easily:

PRINT intNumber

This would output to the screen the value assigned to “intNumber.”   If you want to include text before the number, you must use this format:

 softwareexampledoit    

Dim IntNumber AS INTEGER

CLS

LET intNumber = 100

PRINT “The number is”; intNumber

END

This would output, when run:

The number is 100

“How do I ask the user for something?”

Like strings, You do this by using the INPUT command. :

 softwareexampledoit   DIM IntNumber AS INTEGER

CLS

INPUT intNumber

PRINT “The number is”; intNumber

END

 

This would give the user a prompt for a short integer to assign to “number” and then print it out. You can also supply a prompt for INPUT   to use – like this:

 softwareexampledoit   DIM IntNumber AS INTEGER

CLS

INPUT “Enter a Number”; intNumber

PRINT “You typed “; intNumber; “.”

END

Exercise 1

Write a program to input the user’s name (STRING) and age (INTEGER) and output them using the PRINT command.

The first statement — CLS — stands for “clear screen.” It erases whatever was on the screen before it was executed. PRINT simply displays its argument to the screen at the current text cursor location. The argument in this case is the text enclosed in quotes. PRINT displays text within quotes directly, or it can display the value of a variable, like this:

Program Code – Type it in
DIM intA, intB AS INTEGERCLS

LET intA = 50

LET intB = 100

PRINT “The value of a is “; intA; ” and the value of b is “; intB

END

Test the program with this data
Input: NoneExpected out put:

The value of a is 50 and the value of b is 100.

Test results (Write results in the box below)

This will yield the output; The value of a is 50 and the value of b is 100. The semicolons indicate that the next time something is printed, it will be right after where the last PRINT statement left off. Remember that PRINT prints literally what is inside quotes, and the value of the variable which is not in quotes. intA and intB are integers containing values in this example, and their values are printed using the PRINT statement.

Say you want to interact with the user now. You’ll need to learn a statement called INPUT. INPUT displays a prompt (the first argument) and assigns what the user types in to a variable (the second argument)

 

Program Code – Type it in
DIM strName as StringDIM intAge as Integer

CLS

INPUT “What is your name? “, strName

INPUT “How old are you? “, intAge

PRINT “So, “; strName; “, you are “; intAge; ” years old. That’s interesting.”

END

Test the program with this data
Test 1 Input: Fred, 12

Expected out put:

So, Fred             you are 12 years old. That’s interesting.

Test 2 (Write in your own Test data and expected results)

Test results (Write results in the box below)
Test 1Test 2

This firsts asks the user for their name and assigns it to the string variable strName. Then the age is requested, and the result is printed in a sentence. Try it out! So what happens if you input I DON’T KNOW for the age prompt? You’ll get a weird message that says REDO FROM START. Why? The program is trying to assign a string (text) to an integer (number) type, and this makes no sense so the user is asked to do it over again.

Another cornerstone of programming is the conditional test. Basically, the program tests if a condition is true, and if it is, it does something. It looks like English so it’s not as hard as it sounds.

 softwareexampledoit   DIM intSelection as INTEGER

CLS

PRINT “1. Say hello”      ‘ option 1

PRINT “2. Say nice tie”         ‘ option 2

PRINT “Enter your selection ”

INPUT intSelection

IF intSelection = 1 THEN

PRINT “hello”

ENDIF

IF intSelection = 2 THEN

PRINT “nice tie”

ENDIF

END

The user is given a set of options, and then they input a value which is assigned to the variable selection%. The value of selection% is then tested, and code is executed based on the value. If the user pressed 1, it prints hello, but if they pressed 2, it prints nice tie. Also notice the text after the ‘ in the code. These are remark statements. Anything printed after a ‘ on a line does not affect the outcome of the program. Back to the actual code — but what if the user doesn’t input 1 or 2? What if they input 328? This must be taken into account as part of programming. You usually can’t assume that the user has half a brain, so if they do something wrong, you can’t screw up the program. So the ELSE statement comes into play. The logic goes like this:

 

IF the condition is true, THEN do something, but if the condition is anything ELSE, then do something else. The ELSE statement is used with IF…THEN to test if a condition is anything else.

 softwareexampledoit DIM intNumber as INTEGERCLS

INPUT “Press 1 if you want some pizza.”, intNumber

IF intNumber = 1 THEN

PRINT “Here’s your pizza”

ELSE

PRINT “You don’t get pizza”

ENDIF

END

 

Revision Session 2

Solving simple mathematical problems is one of the easiest tasks that you could do in BASIC. If you are more keen at writing a game or making graphics, you will have to be patient.:) We’ll deal about that later.

Before proceeding, you’ll have to understand some Basic concepts:

What is a program?

A program is a set of instructions that makes the computer work.

In most programs you will have to write you will have to think as follows:

What data do I need to give to the computer?

What operations will the computer have to perform with the data given?

What results will the program display

There are three parts in every task that we accomplish

Input –> Process –> Output

Input: What is needed

Process: What you need to do, calculate with the input

Output: The result obtained when the process has been done

 

Before beginning to code your program, it is important to write algorithms or pseudo codes in plain English that will outline what you want to do.

Algorithms

 An algorithm is a set of precise instructions for solving a problem.  Algorithms can be represented in plain English or in form of flowcharts

Here’s a simple algorithm for calculating the sum of 2 numbers

Get the first numberGet the second number

Calculate the sum

Display the sum

Let’s illustrate this concept using some mathematical examples:

We’ll be using colours to differentiate between the Input, Process and Output parts of the algorithm and program code.

Example 1: Finding the sum of 2 numbers
Write a program that will display the sum of numbers 8 and 12
Algorithm Program Code
Get the first number

Get the second number

Calculate the sum

Write down the result

DIM intNumber1, intNumber2 as INTEGERDIM intSum as INTEGER

intNumber1 = 8

intNumber2 = 12

intSum = intNumber1 + intNumber2

PRINT intSum

Output on Screen
20

You will have noticed that this program is not very explicit. The following code makes the presentation more understandable:

Enhanced Example 1: Finding the sum of 2 numbers
Program Code
DIM intNumber1, intNumber2, intSum AS INTEGERCLS

intNumber1 = 8

intNumber2 = 12

PRINT “This program finds the sum of two numbers”

PRINT “The first number is:”

PRINT intNumber1

PRINT “The second number is:”

PRINT intNumber2

intSum = intNumber1 + intNumber2

PRINT “The sum is:” ;

PRINT intSum

END

Output on Screen
This program finds the sum of two numbers”The first number is:

8

The second number is:

12

The sum is:

20

 

 

 

 

 

The use of semi-colons in the PRINT statement tells BASIC to keep the cursor on the same line.

 

Enhancing Program Presentation

It’s important for you to enhance you program by:

  • Documenting your program
  • Using meaningful variables
  • Saying what is the purpose of the program
  • Documenting your program

As you will notice later, programs may become huge, thus difficult to understand. The REM statement allows you to put remarks in your program. Any line starting with the REM statement is ignored at run-time. You can replace the REM statement by a single-quote ( ) symbol.

The two lines below are similar:

REM Program written by H.B.
‘ Program written by H.B.

The single-quote form of REM can also be placed at the end of a line

PRINT “Welcome everybody” ‘Welcome message

Using meaningful variables

The use single-letter variables may be easy to type especially if your typewriting speed is slow. However they may cause your program to be difficult to understand in the long-run. The use of meaningful variables makes your program easier to understand and maintain.  Here is an illustration:

ix = 2000y = 10

z = x * (100 + y)/100

Could you guess the code above? Now see how it is easy when meaningful variables are used:

LET intOldSalary = 2000LET intPercentageIncrease = 10

LET sngNewSalary  = intOldSalary  * (100 + intPercentageIncrease )/100

Saying what is the purpose of the program Many novice programmers learning how to program, often neglect to say what is the purpose of their program.  Example of an undocumented program:

LET a = 20LET b = 30

LET c = a * b

PRINT “The product is “; c

 

 

As we said above, use the REM statement to put remarks, use meaningful variables and, at run-time, say what your program is doing.

REM This program calculates the product of 2 numbers: 20 and 30.
LET intnumber1 = 20LET intNumber2 = 30LET intProduct = intNumber1 * intNumber2PRINT “This program calculates the product of 2 numbers”PRINT “The first number is”; intNmber1PRINT “The second number is”; intNumber2PRINT “The product is “; intProduct

 

Getting user input at run-time

Two commands or functions that allow you to get user input at run-time are:

The INPUT statement

The INKEY$ function

The INPUT statement

INPUT [variable]

Example:

Example 1: Asking the user for his nameFinding the sum of 2 numbers
Program Code
DIM strYourname AS STRINGPRINT “Enter your name:”;

INPUT strYourname

PRINT “Hello”; strYourname; “. Have a nice day!”

Output on Screen
Enter your name: LoulouHello Loulou. Have a nice day!

 

 

 

The lines:

PRINT “Enter your name:”;

INPUT strYourname

can also be written as:

INPUT “Enter your name:”; strYourname

Personally I prefer to use the first option because it is easier to understand and because it is the standard procedure in most programming languages.

 

Example 2: Asking the user for his score in English and Math and calculating the sum
Program Code
DIM intEnglish AS INTEGERDIM intMath AS INTEGER

DIM intSum AS INTEGER

 

PRINT “Enter your score in English:”;

INPUT intEnglish

PRINT “Enter your score in Math:”;

INPUT intMath

LET intSum = intEnglish + intMath

PRINT “The sum is:”; intSum

Output on Screen
Enter your score in English: 65Enter your score in Math: 59

The sum is: 124

 

 

Program Code – Type it in
DIM sngPi, sngRadius, sngArea as SINGLECLS

LET sngPi = 3.1415

INPUT “What is the radius of the circle? “, sngRadius

LET sngArea = sngPi * sngRadius ^ 2

PRINT “The area of the circle is “, sngArea

END

Test data
Radius Answer
2 12.568
3.2 32.17408
34.567 3754.305
2.345 17.27794

First, we’re defining the variable pi. It’s a single number, which means that it can be a fairly large number with some decimal places. The exclamation mark tells QBasic that sngPi is of the single type. Next, the user is prompted for the radius of their circle. Then the area is calculated. The * means “times,” and the ^ (carrot) means “to the power of.” sngRadius ^ 2 means “radius squared.” This could also be written as:

sngPi! * sngRadius * sngRadius.

 

Worked Examples

 

IPO TABLE For Block problem

Input Process Output
Height (H) Calculate volume by multiplying H X W X L Volume
Width       (W)
Length (L)
Input controls/Variables Calculations Output Controls/variables
sngHeight dblVolume       = sngHeight * sngWidth * sngLength dblVolume
sngWidth
sngLength

 

Structure Chart For Block problem

 

 

Program Code – Type it in
‘Program: Concrete Calculator’Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

‘This program will work out costings for quotes

DIM sngPi, sngRadius, sngArea as SINGLE

Dim sngHeight, sngWidth, sngLength As Single

Dim dblVolume As Double

Dim intStartLine As Integer

‘Main section

‘Set up input screen

intStartLine = 2

Color 10, 1

Cls

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Height”

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Width”

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 5: Print “Length”

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Volume”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, sngHeight

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, sngWidth

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 12: INPUT ” “, sngLength

‘Calculate Volume

dblVolume = sngHeight * sngWidth * sngLength

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; dblVolume;

END

Test data
Write in some test data here

Expected Results


  Exercises

  • Create the test data and state the output the program should produce for the problems below.
  • At least five different tests for each.
  • Write the QBASIC code to solve the problem – USE MEANINGFUL VARIABLE NAMES AND COMMENTS.
  • Print out copies of the program and the test results, keep them in a safe place as they are to be handed in.
  1. Add two numbers input from the keyboard together and output the answer.
  1. Subtract     two numbers input from the keyboard together and output the answer.
  1. Divide two numbers input from the keyboard together and output the answer.
  1. Add three numbers input from the keyboard together and then divide the sum by 3.Output the answer to this calculation as the average. (Do the problem     as two separate calculations not one)
  1. Rewrite exercise using just one calculation.
  1. Input the cost of an item and add 30% of its cost as profit to give the retail price. Output the retail price.

 

Print Using revisited

PRINT [#filenumber%,] USING formatstring$; expressionlist [{; | ,}]

LPRINT USING formatstring$; expressionlist [{; | ,}]

The PRINT with no arguments prints a blanks line so we can separate our answers.

Say you want to print something in a certain pre-defined format. Say you want to print a series of digits with only 2 places after the decimal point and a dollar sign before the first digit. To do this requires the PRINT USING statement, which is very handy in applications for businesses. The PRINT USING statement accepts two types of arguments. The first is a string which has already been defined. This is a special type of string, in that it contains format specifiers, which specify the format of the variables passed as the other arguments. Confused? You won’t be. Here’s a quick list of the most common format specifiers:

###         digits

&              Prints an entire string

\       \       Prints a string fit within the backslashes. Any thing longer is truncated

$$              Puts a dollar sign to the left of a number

.                Prints a decimal point

,                Prints a comma every third digit to the left of the decimal point.

  • And these can be combined in a format string to make a user defined way to print something.
  • So $$#,###.## will print a number with a dollar sign to the left of it. If the number has more than two decimal places, it is truncated to two. If it is more than four digits long to the left of the decimal place, it is also truncated to fit.
  • To use a PRINT USING statement, you must first define the format string containing the format specifiers. Then you use PRINT USING, then the name of the format string, and variable values to fill the places defined in the format string.

Here’s a code example:

 softwareexampledoit DIM intA AS INTEGERDIM strA AS STRING

intA = 123.4567

PRINT USING “###.##”; intA

PRINT USING “+###.####”; intA

strA = “ABCDEFG”

PRINT USING “!”; strA

PRINT USING “\ \”; strA

Program Code – Type it in
DIM strItemName AS STRINGDIM strFormat AS STRING

DIM intNumItems AS INTEGER

DIM sngItemCost, sngTotalCost AS SINGLE

CLS

‘ get user input

INPUT “Enter item name: “, strItemName

INPUT “How many items?: “, intNumItems

INPUT “What does one cost?: “, sngItemCost

CLS

‘ display inputs

strFormat = “\          \         #,###     $$#,###.##         $$#,###,###.##”

PRINT “Item Name             Quantity   Cost               Total Cost   ”

PRINT “————–         ——–   ———-   ————–”

sngTotalCost = intNumItems * sngItemCost

PRINT USING strFormat; strItemName ; intNumItems ; sngItemCost; sngTotalCost

END

Test the program with this data

First, we get the item name, number of items, and cost per item from the user. Then we clear the screen and define the format string to be used. It contains a static length string (text that will be truncated if it is too long), up to 4 digits for the quantity, 4 digits and two decimals for the item cost, and 7 digits and two decimals for the total cost. Then we print out some column headers so we know what each value will represent, and some nice lines to go under the column headers. Then the total cost is calculated by multiplying the number of items by the item cost. Finally, the four variable’s values are displayed under the column headers using the PRINT USING statement.

Volume of a Cylinder

Volume of a cylinder is the area of the a circle making up the clynder times the height of the cylinder.

Area = pi X radius X radius

Volume = Area X height

Or

Volume = pi X radius X radius X height

Or

Volume = pi X radius2  X height

IPO TABLE For Cylinder problem

Input Process Output
Radius (R) Calculate volume by multiplying pi * radius * radius * Length Volume
Length (L)
Input controls/Variables Calculations Output Controls/variables
sngHeight dblVolume       = 3.142 * sngRadius * sngRadius * sngLength dblVolume
sngRadius

Structure Chart For Cylinder problem

 

A Data Dictionary

 

Variable Name Description/Use Type Picture
sngHeight Height of Cylinder Single 9999.99
sngRadius Radius of Cylinder Single 9999.99
dblVolume Volumeof Cylinder Double 999999.99

 

Program Code – Type it in
‘Program: Concrete Calculator’Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

‘This program will work out costings for quotes

Dim sngLength, sngRadius As SINGLE

Dim dblVolume, As DOUBLE

Dim intStartLine AS INTEGER

Const conPi = 3.142

‘Procedure to calculate volume of a cylinder

Color 10, 1

CLS

‘draw input screen

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Radius”

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Length”

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Volume”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, sngRadius

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, sngLength

‘Calculate Volume

LET dblVolume = conPi * sngRadius ^ 2 * sngLength

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; dblVolume;

END

Test the program with this data
Pi Radius Volume
3.142 2 12.568
3.142 343 2155.412
3.142 5435435 34156274
3.142 0.000005 3.14E-05
3.142 -453 -2846.652
3.142 45.435 285.5135
3.142 boo #ERROR!

 

Enter the following programs and test they are working correctly

 

Exercise 3

Payroll Problem

 

Write an IPO table to process payroll. To calculate Pay multiply hours work time rate of pay.

Input Process Output
Input controls/Variables Calculations Output Controls/variables

 

 

Now draw a Sructure Chart for the problem

Program Code – Type it in
‘Program: Payroll program’Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

 

DIM sngRate, shgHours,sngWage AS SINGLE

DIM strName As STRING

DIM intPayNum, intStartLine As Integer

‘Main section

‘Set up input screen

intStartLine = 2

Color 10, 1

CLS

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Name”

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Payroll Number”

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 5: Print “Pay Rate”

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Hours”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, strName

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, intPAyNum

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 12: INPUT ” “, sngRate

LOCATE intStartLine + 11, 12: INPUT ” “, sngHours

‘Calculate Volume

LET sngWage = sngHours * sngRate

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING   “#####.##”; sngPay;

END

Test the program with this data

Expected Results

Enter the following programs and test they are working correctly using the supplied test data. Note some of these programs may not be working correctly. If the program is not working properly state on the listing you produced what was wrong with it and what you did to correct it.

Exercise 4

Using this sheet annotate the listing below describing what each line does.

‘Program: Payroll program

‘Author Michael Fabbro

‘Date 7 December 2003

DIM sngRate, shgHours,sngWage AS SINGLE

DIM strName As STRING

DIM intPayNum, intStartLine As Integer

‘Main section

‘Set up input screen

intStartLine = 2

Color 10, 1

CLS

LOCATE 2, 25: Print “Concrete Calculator”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 5: Print “Name”

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 5: Print “Payroll Number”

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 5: Print “Pay Rate”

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 15: Print “Hours”

LOCATE intStartLine + 5, 12: INPUT ” “, strName

LOCATE intStartLine + 7, 12: INPUT ” “, intPAyNum

LOCATE intStartLine + 9, 12: INPUT ” “, sngRate

‘Calculate Volume

sngWage = sngHours * sngRate

LOCATE intStartLine + 15, 24: Print USING “#####.##”; sngPay;

END
Glossary of Basic found in this Chapter.

PRINT

Writes data to the screen or to a file. LPRINT prints data on the printer LPT1.

Print [#filenumber%,]; [expressionlist]; [{; | ,}]

LPRINT [expressionlist] [{; | ,}]

filenumber%       The number of an open file. If you don’t specify a file number, PRINT writes to the screen.

expressionlist   A list of one or more numeric or string expressions to print.

{; | ,}          Determines where the next output begins:

; means print immediately after the last value.

, means print at the start of the next print zone.

Print zones are 14 characters wide.

See Also PRINT USING, LPRINT USING,   WIDTH,   WRITE

TAB

Moves the text cursor to a specified print position.

TAB(column%)

column%   The column number of the new print position.

Example:

Print Tab(25); “Text”

SPC

Skips a specified number of spaces in a PRINT or LPRINT statement.

SPC(n%)

n%   The number of spaces to skip; a value in the range

o through 32, 767#

Example:   Print “Text1”; Spc(10); “Text2”

CLS

Clears the screen.

Cls [{0 | 1 | 2}]

CLS     Clears either the text or graphics viewport. If a graphics viewport has been set using VIEW), clears only the graphics viewport. Otherwise, clears the text viewport or entire screen.

CLS 0   Clears the screen of all text and graphics.

CLS 1   Clears the graphics viewport or the entire screen if no graphics viewport has been set.

CLS 2   Clears the text viewport.

See Also VIEW     VIEW PRINT   WINDOW

REM

Allows explanatory remarks to be inserted in a program.

Rem remark

‘ remark

remark   Any text.

Remarks are ignored when the program runs unless they contain

metacommands. A remark can be inserted on a line after an executable statement if it is preceded by the single-quote (‘) form of REM or if REM is preceded by a colon (:).

Example:

   Rem   This is a comment.

    ‘     This is also a comment.

    Print “Test1”       ‘This is a comment after a PRINT statement.

    Print “Test2”:   Rem This is also a comment after a PRINT statement.


LET

 

Assigns the value of an expression to a variable.

[LET] variable=expression

■ variable     Any variable. Variable names can consist of up to 40                     characters and must begin with a letter. Valid characters are A-Z, 0-9, and period (.).

■ expression   Any expression that provides a value to assign.

■ Use of the optional LET keyword is not recommended. The

variable=expression assignment statement performs the same action

with or without LET.

 

LOCATE

Moves the cursor to a specified position on the screen.

CSRLIN returns the current row position of the cursor.

POS returns the current column position of the cursor.

LOCATE [row%] [,[column%] [,[cursor%] [,start% [,stop%]]]]

CSRLIN

POS(expression)

■ row% and column%   The number of the row and column to which the

cursor moves.

■ cursor%             Specifies whether the cursor is visible:

0 = invisible, 1 = visible

■ start% and stop%   Integer expressions in the range 0 through 31

that specify the first and last cursor scan lines.

You can change the cursor size by changing the

cursor scan lines.

■ expression         Any expression.

Task – Data Types
 

Task 1

Data types include string/ text; integer; floating point; byte; date; Boolean other eg long, double single. Using examples from Microsoft Qbasic and other languages, describe the benefits of the appropriate choice of data types available to the programmer, eg additional validation, efficiency of storage, strong typing.

Task 2

Write the following program for a mail order company. Input the purchase cost of an item add 30% to give the retail then add a delivery charge of 10% of the retail cost.

Ensure your  programs are documented with comments. You should submit

 

a) Structure chart

b) Test data and the results expected

c) A listing of the program’s code with comments

d) A screen grab of you program’s results with the test data.

e) A Data dictionary of variables.

 

 


01 Introduction to Software Design using QBASIC

There are six sections to this tutorial:

  1. Introduction
  2. Basics ‘Basic’
  3. Decisions and Loops
  4. Procedures
  5. The SIPOS Way


Introduction to Software Design using QBASIC

QBasic is a programming language designed for DOS (disk operating system) and is a very good language to learn and then  migrate  to modern day languages like VBA, VBSCRIPT, ASP, Visual Basic, C++, javascript and Java. You will learn to deal with more code, commands, and complex routines. Once you have learnt these basics, it easier to learn other more modern languages. You will find (QBasic.exe and QBasic.hlp)  on DOS disks and Windows 98-95 CDs.

Typing

QBasic allows to you define the ‘type’  of variable as number or characters like C++. It also allows loose typing, i.e where context tells you the type of data stored. Below is show how variables can be ‘typed,’ for loose typing all you need to do is give a variable a value:

name$ =” fred

age=3

pay = 3.45

This means spelling errors in variable names can cause problems. JavaScript is prone to this. QBasic provides good practice in dealing with this problem.

Warning

The tutorial can be used in standalone mode, but is designed to complement classroom teaching. Do not switch off and think you can do this course all by yourself at the last minute.

Navigation

You can navigate the tutorial using the menu shown below. You can see it in the banner above.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this tutorial  you will know about:

  • The basic nature and features of a procedural programming language
  • Variables –  naming conventions and data types: text; integer; floating point; byte; date; Boolean. The benefits of appropriate choice of data type eg additional validation and efficiency of storage
  • How and when to use assignment statements; input statements; output statements
  • How to use Loops eg conditional (pre-check, post-check), fixed to repeat actions
  • How to use conditional statements and logical operators to make decisions
  • How and when to use assignment statements; input statements; output statements
  • How to use functions and procedures
  • Understand how to design software and use design tools
  • Understand the software development life cycle
  • Be able to design and create a program
  • Technical documentation: requirements specification; other as appropriate to
    structure charts, data dictionary
  • Be able to document, test, debug and review a programmed solution
  • Testing and debugging: test strategy; test plan structure eg test, date, expected
    result, actual resultUser documentation: eg details of hardware platform required, loading instructions, user guide; getting help